Critter Control Umatilla

Best Umatilla Florida Wildlife Control

animal pest management

Umatilla, FL, may be the happiest place on earth, but that doesn’t stop nuisance Florida wildlife from moving to the area. Bats, for example, are prevalent. These pests carry rabies and easily break into attics, one of their favorite places to roost. Surprisingly, they only need a gap less than half an inch wide to get in. As their droppings pile up, so do histoplasmosis spores that can lead to lung infections. Bat waste also stains exterior walls at entry points.

Our focus is on removing the animal from your home in the most humane and safe way possible. We want to make sure your family is safe. We also make sure the animal is treated humanely and removed properly, abiding by the laws of Umatilla Florida in dealing with household pests.

This is where our expert staff comes in. We’ve removed every conceivable kind of animal from Florida homes. We handle snakes, rats, mice, raccoons, birds and armadillos. Coastal Wildlife Removal of Orlando is your best choice in Umatilla wildlife removal.

Raccoon Feces & Urine – Do They Cause Disease?

in Umatilla Davenport FL
  • Venomous Snake Removal Services

  • Water Moccasin a.k.a. Cottonmouth Control

  • Venomous Snake Removal Services

  • What if a Skunk Got Inside My House?

racoon removal

Since childhood, I have had an uncontrollable drive to learn everything possible concerning snakes.  The species or sub-species made no difference at all, I was completely captivated by any snake that crossed my path both in real life or on paper.  There are between 2.800 and 3.000 species of snakes living today and new species are being discovered yearly from around the world.  As I grew up and finally left home, I was able to seek out different species and spend time actually handling them and adding to my notes. I became interested in venomous species after receiving a bite on my left hip while crossing a beaver dam one evening in Georgia.  My right leg had went through the top layer of dried sticks and as I went down, I managed to drag a Southern Cottonmouth (Agkistrodon p. piscivorus) down with me and when I hit the bottom it turned and one fang hit my wallet and the other hit my on the hip. 

After escaping the scene, I was taken to a country doctor who looked after me in his kitchen for a few hours.  He was a real country MD who was semi retired and just saw folks from the country side when they needed him, in the comfort of his living room.  We talked and he explained quite a bit about venomous snakes that I had not already learned.  He told me things that captivated me, things like, a snake can inject venom from the left or right fang, from both fangs or not inject any venom at all. He said I was lucky and the snake that tagged me delivered a "Dry" bite and injected no venom!  By the time I left that doctors home I had decided to make venomous snakes my specialty of study, and at 21 years old, I had a few years ahead of me to learn what I could about these amazing creatures. 

Little did I know that at the age of sixty I would still only have scratched the surface with regards to the secrets snakes hide from humans.  Since that day in 1972, there has not been a day that passed in which snakes had not been a topic of conversation in one way or another.  I have made it a point to learn something new about these wonderful creatures every day since then.  That was 38 years ago and I still learn something new every day, believe it or not.  Scientist are still ignorant when it comes to knowing all there is to know about these creatures and with new technology coming of age all the time, new facts are being learned constantly and old beliefs are being replaced by new fact.

In 1995, I had been reading about a man who is considered the father of serpentology, Mr. Bill Haast of Miami Serpentarium had been working with snakes almost all of his 80 years and still remained very active in the world of Herpetology.  Name a snake and Bill has most likely worked with it and probably been bitten by it at one time or another.  He had started injecting himself with minute amounts of Elapid venom, from snakes such as cobras, krates, coral snakes and mambas to name but a few in order to build up an immunity to their venom which could save his life should he receive a bite from one in the future.  His efforts were not in vein when he received a bite from an Indian cobra with very little reaction to the venom.  His body had built up its own anti venom against the snakes he had used in the serum he perfected. 

In more then one instance, his blood was injected into snake bite victims who could not take anti venom with the same results as the anti venom would have delivered, a complete reversal of symptoms and a full recovery.  The venom Elapids, is for the most part a neurotoxin and does little destruction to tissue, it merely stops organs from functioning.  In most instances, the venom of a cobra for example will shut down the nerve centers which signal the lungs to function and death is a result of respiratory failure, in others, the muscles stop functioning, the heart forgets to pump blood and death is a result of cardiac failure and so on.  Vipers and Pit Vipers are different for the most part in that they destroy tissue as well as the tissue of certain organs.  The necrotic tissue is spilled into the blood stream and filtered by the Kidneys. 

I probably get four calls or letters a year asking me the best method of starting an immunology project with various species of snakes and my answer is always the same, "Don't do it".  Does that make me a hypocrite or someone who wants to hoard the information all to himself? I say NO.  I refuse to help someone for the same reasons that others refused to help me!  Humans are individuals and each acts separately to any toxin injected into the body.  I am not by any sense of the word a medical doctor, I know how to treat myself if bitten but I don't know how to treat anyone else other then getting them to a doctor who can help them.  To undertake a project like this, takes a great deal of study and has to have a good amount of luck to boot. 

If you were sensitive to a venom, an anaphylactic reaction could kill you within five minutes after the injection.  Had I not done it years ago, I would not start doing it now, there are to many cons that could end up putting you in a box or paralyzed in some bed for the rest of your life and nothing is worth that.  I chose to immunize against Pit Vipers and Vipers because I work with them every day and have received a few more tags since the Eastern diamondback bite and I am pleased with the results of my project.  If I specialized in non venomous snakes, I would never have started it anyway, there would have never been a need.  In the end, the benefits well outweigh the risks especially when I stopped drinking and dropped the 35 excess pounds.  The one other added bonus comes from the Southern Copperhead venom I have used over the years!  This venom contains a small protein which is called "Contortrostatin" and has been proven to halt cancer in its tracks, it stops the spread or migration of cancer to other parts of the body and shrinks the tumor if one exists.  So I came out smelling pretty good but please I am begging you, talk to your family doctor prior to undertaking any program that has anything to do with your health.  That was the reason for not stating the amounts of venom used and how it was transformed into a vaccine from raw venom.  There is no quick fixes out there and standard medical treatment is still the golden rule for halting any disease. 

This was my story and I do not have any regrets for any of the actions I have taken, as unethical as they might seem.  My story is exactly that, my story and only a fool would attempt to copy me as the vital parts to my vaccine have been left out.  Do yourself a favor and go mainstream, if you deal with venomous species of snakes on a daily basis, you have to decide for yourself as to which is the best way to overcome a bite but I reiterate, "Go Mainstream", it is much safer.  Proper instruction when handling venomous snakes is essential and there is absolutely no substitute for proper training and even then it takes years to graduate with the title of "Expert handler".  Be safe!

Umatilla

Can I Use Poison to Kill Bats?

humane wildlife services
  • Trapping Tips

  • How to Find and Remove a Dead Skunk

  • Is a Skunk That is Active During the Day Time Rabid?

  • Squirrels Living in the Chimney

Astatula FL

Armadillos may not look like any other creature in North America, but they can certainly be as destructive as the best of them. Armadillos mainly make their homes in the southern states of the US and in areas of Mexico and South America where the soil is soft and warm. Armadillos must dig for most of their food as their diet largely consists of worms, grubs and insects. While normally, these animals are considered as harmless (dare I say cute in an ugly way) critters, they can do a considerable amount of damage to your property.

Armadillos are regarded as pests by landscapers, homeowners and gardeners alike because of their incessant need to dig. Not only do they have to dig for their meals, but most of the issues that arise around armadillos are about their burrows. Armadillos obviously don't understand that some places are not ideal to dig their burrow, so they often end up under your house or your porch. If they burrow too close to the supporting beams of your porch/house/etc. it can actually cause the foundation of your structures to crack! Do not let this happen to you, there are some things that you can do to get rid of your armadillo problem.

DON'T:
1. Attempt to poison the armadillo. Not only is it ineffective, it is dangerous to all other animals, your pets and your family to lay out poison.

2. Shoot them or use any other inhumane method of getting rid of them.

3. Buy and use repellents; they simply do not work and you will end up wasting your money.

4. Do not put up your fence without getting the armadillos out of your yard first.

Getting rid of your armadillo problem doesn't have to give you heartburn. When in doubt, call a professional near you to help you with your problem. This is the easiest (and cheapest in some cases) way to handle your armadillo issues.

What Do Rats Eat?

free animal removal services
  • What is a Skunk's Natural Diet?

  • Signs of a Raccoon Infestation

  • Identify Areas of Skunk Damage

  • Squirrels in Attics

Oviedo FL

Rattlesnakes are one of four poisonous snakes that inhabit the United States. There are several different varieties of rattle snake that can be found across all of the contiguous 48 states of the United States: the Prairie Rattlesnake, the Eastern Diamondback, the Timber Rattlesnake, and the Western Diamondback. Some of the rattlesnake species are comparably small, while other species can grow as long as 8 feet. The Diamondback Rattlesnake, located in western states, is responsible for more snake bite-related deaths in the U.S. than any other snake.

The venom of a rattlesnake is hemotoxic, which means that it causes damage to tissues, especially tissues of the circulatory system. The venom also contains neurotoxic compounds that interfere with the function of the nervous system. Interestingly, the venom of a juvenile rattlesnake actually contains a higher concentration of neurotoxins than that of a mature adult snake.

If you get bitten by a snake, and you don't know what kind of snake it was, you should inspect the bite wound. If there are two visible fang marks at the site of the bite, the snake was poisonous. There will also be a significant amount of pain and inflammation at the site of the bite wound. You may also feel nauseated and weak, or have a strange rubber-like taste in your mouth.

If you need to move to call or get help, make sure to wait for about twenty minutes after the bite occurred in order to slow the flow of venom through your veins as much as possible. If you know that it is going to be a long time, say several hours, before help can reach you, lie still with the bitten area lower than your heart. It would also be good to use a coat or blanket to cover yourself up and preserve your body heat.

The best choice is to avoid getting bitten in the first place. If you spend a lot of time outside, hiking, biking, etc., it is wise to learn about the types of poisonous snakes that you could encounter, their habits and areas where they prefer to live. Because snakes are cold blooded, they are most active when the weather is warm, so be extra cautious of snakes in warm weather. Rattle snakes have their built-in alert system when they feel threatened, they rattle their tales, so take heed and move away from an aggravated rattlesnake as quickly and quietly as possible to avoid getting bitten.


Florida Critter Removal