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Coastal Wildlife Removal – Florida Nuisance Wild Animal Control Services

Many of Florida’s wild animals have learned to adapt and even thrive in our homes. For example some wildlife have found that attics make great places to live. Other animals find refuge under homes or porches. Invariably, these animals cause damage. Rodents, like squirrels and rats, love to chew on electrical wires once in an attic, and this causes a serious fire hazard. Raccoons can cause serious contamination in an attic with their droppings and parasites. Same goes for bat or bird colonies. We specialize in solving Florida’s wildlife problems, from snake removal to large jobs like commercial bat control, we do it all.

How Much is an Attic Restoration?

humane pest control
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  • Baby Raccoon Removal & Rescue

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critter removal

Armadillos are relatively recent immigrants to the American south and southeast. Their population has spread rapidly in the few decades they've been in the United States, and they have already taken over nearly all of the non-desert areas of the southern half of the country. Most commonly seen as road kill, armadillos are also pests that can destroy extensive amounts of outdoor space with the digging and burrowing they do to search for food.

The Basics
The most common variety found in the United States is the nine-banded armadillo. They generally weigh between 12 and 22 pounds. They are protected by a hard outer armor that looks a bit like a shell. They have long claws that are optimized for digging, which they extensively do in their search for insects, their main source of food. 'Dillos have powerful noses that can smell an insect through 8 inches of soil, and they're not shy about chasing after a meal. They are mostly nocturnal animals who live in burrows when they are not out digging up insects.

Remove Your Problem
It can be difficult for an amateur to keep their yards safe from these insect hunters. Fences are easy for them to burrow underneath, and scent deterrents either wash away or take excessive effort to properly implement. Your best bet for removing and excluding armadillos from your yard or home is to call a professional pest control team. These wildlife extraction experts will be able to safely remove and relocate your pesky armored intruder. Once your pesky visitor is gone, your pest control experts can make recommendations on how to successfully keep any future intruders out of your yard and away from your house.

Skunk Tracks

Goldenrod FL
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  • Squirrels in Homes

  • Bat Removal and Exclusion

  • Remove Any Bats That Are Living in Your Home

Deltona FL

When you think about where poisonous snakes live, you might picture tropical climates or desert ranges throughout the country. Not many people would associate seemingly innocent forests and wooded areas in Indiana as homes to venomous snakes. But the truth is, out of the 39 species of snake found in Indiana, there are 4 species that are poisonous. Continue reading to learn which ones!

The Water Moccasin Agkistrodon piscivorus

Also known as Eastern Cottonmouths, Water Moccasins are a poisonous subspecies of pitviper that can deliver a painful and potentially deadly bite. Bites are treated with a serum called CroFab anti-venom. Although usually not fatal, their cytotoxic venom can cause severe scarring, tissue deterioration, and possible amputation. They are the only species of semiaquatic vipers in the world, usually living in or near marches, slow-moving streams, and lake areas. Most Cottonmouths live in warmer regions, so it is unlikely to ever spot one in the north. But there is a small population known to exist near the southern border of Indiana. Although their patterns often get them confused for common water snakes, you can tell a Water Moccasin apart because it displays a distinguishable inner white mouth when agitated or annoyed.

The Timber Rattlesnake Crotalus horridus

Another endangered venomous pitviper species, the Timber Rattlesnake is often found living on dry deciduous forests and hillsides surrounding rugged terrain. Unfortunately for Hoosiers, the Timber Rattlesnake is among the most dangerous in the country. This is because they are large in size, extremely venomous, and have long fangs. Its venom is neurotoxic, hemorrhagic, and proteolytic.